Sculpture: ‘Metropolis II’ (2010) by Chris Burden at LACMA, Los Angeles « Art Blart

This is really, really cool! There is a video below as well.

“Created by artist Chris Burden, Metropolis II (2010) is a complex, large-scale kinetic sculpture modeled after a fast-paced modern city. The armature of the piece is constructed of steel beams, forming an eclectic grid interwoven with an elaborate system of eighteen roadways, including a six-lane freeway, train tracks, and hundreds of buildings. 1,100 miniature toy cars speed through the city at 240 scale miles per hour on the specially designed plastic roadways. Every hour, the equivalent of approximately 100,000 cars circulates through the sculpture. “The noise, the continuous flow of the trains, and the speeding toy cars, produces in the viewer the stress of living in a dynamic, active and bustling 21st Century city.”

Sculpture: ‘Metropolis II’ (2010) by Chris Burden at LACMA, Los Angeles « Art Blart.

My God, it’s full of galaxies

Posted by on Mar 27, 2012 in 21st Century, Inspiration, The Little Things | No Comments

Holy S#&T!!!!!

“The VISTA telescope in Chile recently took a photo of the sky that contains over 200,000 galaxies. For reference, the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field image shows only about 10,000 galaxies (but sees further back in time, I think).

I’ve spent years studying all this, and it still sometimes gets to me: just how flipping BIG the Universe is! And this picture is still just a tiny piece of it: it’s 1.2 x 1.5 degrees in size, which means it’s only 0.004% of the sky! And it’s not even complete: more observations of this region are planned, allowing astronomers to see even deeper yet.”

Here’s a full view of the image that looks sorta unimpressive:

You can download the original 17,000 x 11,000 pixel image here (250 Mb, yo) for the full effect. As a preview, this is several levels of zoom in…just a tiny part of the full image.

 


My God, it’s full of galaxies
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Facebook Agrees: The Key To Its Future Success Is Design | Co.Design: business + innovation + design

What makes Facebook so intriguing, engaging and, well, addicting you ask? Great question!

Most digital experiences focus on helping humans interact with technology. Facebook helps humans interact with humans. That’s a huge difference!

‘”The biggest thing that’s different is that Facebook is not about human-computer interaction,” says Cox. Most designers in the computer industry have focused on helping humans interact with machines. But Facebook is about human-to-human interaction. “We don’t want people to remember their interactions with Facebook,” says director of design Kate Aronowitz. “We want them to remember their interactions with their friends and family.” Cox calls this “social design.” “It’s more like designing a plaza or a restaurant,” he explains. “The best building is one where the people inside get it and work together and are connected. That connectivity is created by how everything is arranged.”‘

Facebook Agrees: The Key To Its Future Success Is Design | Co.Design: business + innovation + design.

Digital tool to help illustrate the importance of responsive web design

Posted by on Mar 23, 2012 in 21st Century, Design, Experience Design, Technology | No Comments

I found a great set of tools to use with your clients to help them understand the importance of designing for mobile interfaces. Each of the links at the end of the post allow you to enter any URL and see how it would display as a responsive site across a myriad of the most popular mobile devices.

To clarify, a responsive site is designed to read the width of the device it is being displayed on and render the experience so the content formats correctly allowing the visitor to easily consume the content. Here is a screen grab of what a good responsive design looks like:

As you can see, the content is reconfigured for each width so that it creates a seamless and clean experience across different screen resolutions.

What’s so great about the links below is the visualization of the content when not properly optimized and designed for a mobile experience. It’s a great way to show clients how much a digital experience can suffer when mobile devices are not considered in the design and development process.

To put some context around the importance of designing for mobile, in 2010 40% of adults accessed the internet via a phone compared to 32% in 2009. So, it’s a pretty large demographic that is unfortunately seeing something like this when they pull up a site that is not responsive, at full size, on a mobile device: (normally any site will auto reduce to fit on a mobile screen but that’s not optimal either when you need to read or click on buttons that are displaying at around 50% smaller than they should.)

Hopefully these tools can help us teach our clients the importance of considering the mobile space when developing digital experiences.

Here are the links. They all do the same thing, they just have different interfaces. Don’t forget, you can input any URL you want.

http://mattkersley.com/responsive/

http://responsive.is/ (space to add url is in the top right)

http://www.responsinator.com/ (space to add url is in the top left)

Please let me know if you have any questions.

The Story’s the Thing – Boxes and Arrows: The design behind the design

Exceptional article on the foundation that stories create for designing digital experiences and why they are such an important part of the research/discover process.

“This work [a breast cancer site for a Non-profit], more than any other I’d done before, taught me that stories aren’t merely an extra layer we add to binary logic and raw data. In fact, it’s reversed—the stories are the foundations of our lives, and the data, the information, is the artificial abstraction. Information is just the dusty mirror we use to reflect upon ourselves, merely a tool for self-awareness.”

The Story’s the Thing – Boxes and Arrows: The design behind the design.

The Dangers of Our ‘Inconvenient Mind’ | Risk: Reason and Reality | Big Think

Posted by on Mar 22, 2012 in 21st Century, Insights & Reflections, Social | No Comments

“Here’s some bad news for those of you who like to think you can think rationally about risk. You can’t. You know all those thoughtfully considered views you have about nuclear power or genetically modified food or climate change? They are really no more than a jumble of facts, and how you feel about those facts. That’s right. They’re just your opinions. Which is bad news, because no matter how right you feel, you might be wrong. And being wrong about risk is risky, to you AND to others.”

The author goes on to name how we rationalize risks as a Perception Gap. It made me think of what we are confronting in the “Re-set” step of our approach when engaging new clients.

The Dangers of Our ‘Inconvenient Mind’ | Risk: Reason and Reality | Big Think.

What the Space Shuttle booster saw

Posted by on Mar 22, 2012 in 21st Century, The Little Things, Video | No Comments

Incredible journey to space through two cameras attached to the rocket boosters of the space shuttle and record the entire trip into space and back down to the ocean.

The sound is absolutely amazing. As Kottke put it, “who knew that being in space sounds like being trapped with a whale underwater in a tin pail?”

What the Space Shuttle booster saw.

Without The Right Message, Twitter Is No Better For Your Brand Than A Fax Machine | Fast Company

This is a must read article!

The core point is that social media isn’t a brand strategy. If you had nothing interesting to share before you had a social media channel, you’ll have nothing interesting share just because you now have one.

It’s an important lesson, and one we may take for granted because we are so immersed in the importance of the message. But, are the people we work with as immersed as us?

Ill leave you with a great cartoon illustrating the misunderstood and misplaced use of the “like” button.

Ill leave you with a great cartoon illustrating the misunderstood and misplaced use of the “like” button.

Without The Right Message, Twitter Is No Better For Your Brand Than A Fax Machine | Fast Company.